I am so glad I decided on this company.  The home inspector knew his stuff, and he explained the inspection report in a way that was clear.  I was able to negotiate my purchase and saved a lot of money.  Thanks for everything.        -  Karla P., San Diego

Blog Tales From The Crawl Space Running On Your Belly
Running On Your Belly
Tales From The Crawl Space
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Have you ever ran on your belly? I didn't know it was possible until last week. A real estate agent calls me for a last minute home inspection on a home in the La Mesa area. Apparently the home inspector that the realtor typically uses had backed out last-minute. So it was Housecall to the rescue. I agree to do the inspection, jump in my van and off I go. While en route the realtor offers me a lockbox code and tells me that nobody else will be visiting the property and that I could just do the home inspection and report back to her my findings. Common enough, I thought. Often times when I'm doing home inspections I'm the only one at the home. And that brings us to an important point.

If you’re a home inspector, it is wise to let someone you know close to you what part of town you will be in and your game plan for the day. Keep in mind accidents do happen. You could fall off a ladder and lose consciousness. Any one of a number of things could happen to you. So remember, safety first.

But here's the part where I must say do as I say not as I do.

So I arrive at the house and I find windows that are covered in plywood, and a home largely in disrepair. On top of that, the nearest home is probably a mile away. Nothing here but me and the wind whipping through the trees. So I go on about my business.

The last part of the home to be surveyed is the crawlspace. A standard order of business when arriving at a home inspection is to open up access doors of the crawlspace just in case there happens to be some undesirable wildlife taking up residence under the home. Believe me, I've been nose to nose with a skunk more times than I can count. I'd rather give the critters the opportunity to leave peacefully. So at the access hatch I begin suiting up for the crawl. Typical gear includes a full military jumpsuit, safety glasses, gloves, a breathing respirator, headlamp, flashlight with extra batteries and of course my camera. Once suited up I insert my flashlight through the opening to the crawlspace and waved it around. I'd rather have something attack my flashlight than my head if you know what I mean. What I notice after performing this action are a few bees sorta hanging around the entrance to the crawlspace. Not so unusual, I thought. So in I go.

I began crawling around the dark nastiness and say hello to a half a dozen spiders and various other creepy crawlies. This is par for the course as a home inspector. I begin noting excessive moisture, sewer pipes that are approaching the end of their useful lives, some termite activity, etc. what I should've been paying attention to was the quiet hum emanating from the northeast corner of the crawlspace.

I quickly find that I'm not alone in this serene and tranquil environment. Buzzing surrounds me. Honeybee landing on milkthistle02The flutter of tiny wings stirs the air. A battle has begun and I have trespassed into the sanctity of a very active community of bees.

I'll draw an analogy to that of the bumblebee. You see, with a body like that it is a violation of many laws of physics to think that it can fly. But as you've been told, nobody ever told the bumblebee that it can't fly.

And nobody ever told me that I can't run on my belly.

I cleared the crawlspace in less than 5 seconds. Under pipes, over rocks, twisting and turning avoiding electrical wires and before I know it the sun is upon my face. Gasping for air, I rip off my respirator. Thank God for my jumpsuit! Every square inch of my body was covered so I escaped once again the wrath of the Honeybee.

Until next time,


Areas Served: We serve the areas listed above as well as many others. If you do not see your city, please contact us. We will be proud to serve your city.
Darin Redding
Written on Friday, 06 May 2011 15:04 by Darin Redding

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Housecall Property Inspections
6826 Millbrook St.
San Diego, CA 92120
619-663-8740